Who are your partners?

We are working with a leading drone training company Consortiq to provide customized hands-on training throughout the USA. The training will include teaching you what you need to know to pass the FAA drone pilot licensing test, known as the Part 107 Knowledge Test.

We are working with the Gowrie Group for insurance to cover boating organizations operating drones.


Do you have customer service?

Of course! Our friendly and knowledgeable customer services reps are available to answer your questions.

 

DO I NEED A PART 107 PILOT LICENSE TO OPERATE A DRONE?

The line between recreational and commercial usage can quickly become blurred. Nearly all of the examples of sailing organizations using drones described in this article would come under the FAA’s Commercial usage definition and require the drone operator be a licenses FAA Remote Pilot in Command (RPIC).

  • Commercial use of a drone is defined by the FAA as: “Flying for work, business, non-recreational reasons, or commercial gain.” This typically includes flying a drone for hire, compensation, to provide a service, or for economic benefit of an entity or person. This typically includes flying a drone for hire, compensation, to provide a service, or for economic benefit of an entity or person.  Intended use, not compensation, is the determining factor.
  • Recreational or hobby use of a drone is defined by the FAA as: “Flying for enjoyment and not for work, business purposes, or for compensation or hire.”

For example, if a parent flies a drone (for free) for a junior sailing program, it most likely would be considered hobbyist usage. But if a paid employee or volunteer of a sailing club/organization flies a drone as part of the club’s instruction of junior sailors, it would be considered commercial usage. While situations and usages by or at a yacht club or sailing program vary widely, it is safe to assume that most circumstances will fall under the Commercial use definition. It is important to know which category you fall under, because the requirements for operation, licensing, registration, and insurance differ depending on if the drone is flown for recreational or commercial purposes. Failure to comply with FAA and state/local drone regulations for drone licensing, registration, and/or operating can result in significant penalties and charges including: steep fines (in the thousands of dollars), civil charges (e.g., invasion of privacy), and/or criminal charges (eg, reckless endangerment).

DO I NEED INSURANCE?

While there are currently no federal laws requiring insurance coverage for drones, it is smart risk management to purchase coverage because drones are often excluded from club liability policies. Flying a drone without coverage can expose you, your assets, and your organization to significant lawsuits and claims for bodily injury or property damage. You should seek coverage for the primary exposures below, the first three being the most important, the last three coverages being optional, depending on your appetite to self-insure your drone itself and related equipment. Coverage needs may differ depending on whether or not your organization owns the drone or contracts with a third party (“Owned” vs. “Non-owned” coverage). See the insurance tab.